Monthly Archives: January 2017

Aerial Photography

22 year-old Pamela Colman-Smith, nicknamed Pixie, a US citizen living in London was having an existential crisis. On this day in November Smith needed money to fund a publishing enterprise featuring an Avant-Garde magazine called “The Green Sheaf.” Pixie, like the Peter-Pan of her illustrations, started to feel like her friends had stopped believing in her.
Pixie started making illustrations for Theater Set Design and Theater Costume Design as a child living in London. Her mother was a successful writer of illustrated children books. Her father traveled regularly between Brooklyn, Jamaica and London as auditor for an Industrial Financial Corp that owned the Jamaican Railroad. Hellen Terry, a world famous Shakespearean Theater Actress and co-founder of the Lyceum Theater, was her neighbor. Terry became a mentor and gave the energetic child with the dark hair and eyes the nickname Pixie. The family lived in Jamaica during Pixie’s adolescence. Facing racial issues in New York, Colman-Smith felt London was her best choice for a career. Pixie left Pratt College in Brooklyn in 1899 and traveled to London with her father. Her father died that same year leaving her an orphan. Pixie’s first network of clients came through her association with Terry and the Lyceum Theater group. Her career soared.
Her first illustrated publication of African-Jamaican folk tales, Annancy Stories, was a success. She continued to build her client network through small theater performances of poetry and story reading in her home. Her list included famous playwrights, authors, poets and actors of the era. She excelled in Theatrical Set design and Costume design. Her clients were amazed at how easily she could make an illustration from the thought they were trying to project. If you think it is easy, try it. You will soon change your mind. She was able to monetize her synesthesia. That is seeing images while listening to music.
Everyone has that, to some degree, but hers was extremely advanced. Her fans loved the intellectual tickling that her art evoked. Although she was a child of the 2nd industrial revolution, her illustrations excluded anything from the mechanical age. She was always willing to share her knowledge and experience with other artists. She advised them to have the same energy that drives a piston. Her client list included the most successful playwrights, writers, poets and theatrical performers at the turn of the 20th Century. In her innocence, she felt her clients were her friends. Pamela Coleman Smith could not get a small business loan. It was impossible in that era. No one would loan money for a woman owned business, especially a single woman owned business. She was paid by commissions.
Smith started the publication and used everything she had as leverage to make it work. She had the best content and images from the most respected artists from her network of clients. She continued to do set design and invested the commissions into the magazine. Her graphics were now being attributed to Green Sheaf School, indicating Pixie had a good grasp of Market Branding techniques.
The young woman had worked in the Commercial Art industry as an illustrator since childhood, and had a thorough understanding of the latest technology. Without funding for modern equipment she was forced to use a century old technique for the binding process. It was quaint, but Smith’s business plan called for Avant Garde. The subscription rate didn’t meet expectations. The business was undercapitalized. It failed after 13 issues. Pamela Coleman Smith shut it down. Poor Fool, she found herself at rock bottom financially. Once she got fiscally stable again her career changed direction. She completed a large project that would become the defining project of her career.
She was guaranteed complete artistic control. An immense project, it consisted of 80 illustrations for the Rider-Waite Tarot Deck, accurately illustrated, delivered in 6 months. The project was delivered on time, on budget, to the complete satisfaction of the author, Arthur Waite. Sales of the deck were extremely successful. The only recognition Pixie got was a line in Waite’s accompanying book, “I commissioned a young woman to do the illustrations.” That was it.
No residuals, no intellectual property. In a letter to her business associate, Alfred Stiglitz of the world famous Stiglitz Studio, she said of the project, “It was a large project for very little cash.” What contractor hasn’t made that same statement a time or two? No one knows how much Pixie left on the table, but Waite had a reputation as a tightwad and the contract was verbal. Pixie drifted away from her Golden Dawn friends after that. She continued making fantastic illustrations for the Shakespearean Theater and for publication but on a print-shop scale. She became heavily involved in Woman’s Sufferage. Female publishers were wary of the danger from an angry male population.
She did a lot of work for community works projects, like international relief agencies and veterans programs.
Her uncle from Brooklyn died and left her enough inheritance to help her escape the rat race and move as far away from London as possible, and still remain in England. She moved to the town of Lizard, in Cornwall. That is the area that was known to have the largest concentration of pixies.
Her last visit to the US was when she visited a friend in Brooklyn in 1946. A devoted Catholic, she died in 1951. Her name and ideas faded into antiquity. In the Tarot deck The Fool doesn’t have a number, doesn’t belong to any suit, can go anywhere. The fool is a free spirit always appearing unexpectedly. It happened that way for Stuart Kaplan of US Games in 2009 when he published the Centennial edition of the Rider Waite Smith deck. He sells over 1.5 million decks each year, mostly as stocking stuffers at Christmas. That makes Pamela Colman Smith the most successful illustrator of 21st Century.

Hire A Photo Booth

You have been to many parties thrown by your friends and now it’s your turn to surprise them. Owing to the latest trend, you might have considered hiring a photo booth from one of the different organizations that offer the facility. Surrey and Sussex are two of the organizations based in the respective cities that offer photo booths with a variety of packages. But before you choose your package or hire any of them, you need to think a bit. The following points are to be kept in mind before hiring Surrey Photo Booth or Sussex Photo Booth.
• You need to consider the size of your venue. Bigger the photo booth, the more number of guests it will be able to accommodate and naturally it will take up much of floor space, especially when they come equipped with tables for props and other things. The bigger is not always the better. Once the shot is taken, you can hardly think of the size of the photo booth in which it was clicked. Moreover, smaller booths are more intimate and produce a different type of photo strip, which emphasizes mainly on facial expressions. So you might compare between photo strips from different associations and choose the best one for your party.
• The most common photo strip size is 2 X 6 inches with four individual frames that make up the photo strip. However, there can be variations and you are free to ask your photo booth operator if your desired size of photo strip is available.
• Mostly print copies are given in doubles keeping in mind that one will be carried by the guest and the other will be kept for you. The duplicate is often placed inside the photo album for guest. The guest might also leave a handwritten message for you. The photo booths are generally equipped with machine to cut the photo strip into two. They might also have an attendant who can cut the photo strip. However, some organizers provide only a single copy of the photo and some provide multiple ones. Make sure what will you be provided with before jumping into the project.
• There are certain requirements for setting up a photo booth. Most photo booths require power and so if you are planning a party at your colony park, it might be a problem. In that case you can rather go for a photo booth which has a professional photograph appointed to them. Some photo booths also require shelter from weather. Choose the photo booth according to your theme wisely. Some machines required for the photo booth can be very heavy. So you must make arrangements for carrying them properly. Before booking the photo booth operator, make sure that they will not complain about your party location during the course of their work and function efficiently.
• You have to keep your guests’ ease in mind. If your guests comprise of both adults and children, you should ask your operator to make necessary arrangements so that the height and the props are not inappropriate by any means.
• The cost must fit within your budget. Surrey Photo Booth and Sussex Photo Booth are definitely going to add to the fun in your party. All you need to do is think wisely before choosing the operator.

Know More About Pixie And The Fool

22 year-old Pamela Colman-Smith, nicknamed Pixie, a US citizen living in London was having an existential crisis. On this day in November Smith needed money to fund a publishing enterprise featuring an Avant-Garde magazine called “The Green Sheaf.” Pixie, like the Peter-Pan of her illustrations, started to feel like her friends had stopped believing in her. Pixie started making illustrations for Theater Set Design and Theater Costume Design as a child living in London.
Her mother was a successful writer of illustrated children books. Her father traveled regularly between Brooklyn, Jamaica and London as auditor for an Industrial Financial Corp that owned the Jamaican Railroad. Hellen Terry, a world famous Shakespearean Theater Actress and co-founder of the Lyceum Theater, was her neighbor. Terry became a mentor and gave the energetic child with the dark hair and eyes the nickname Pixie. The family lived in Jamaica during Pixie’s adolescence. Facing racial issues in New York, Colman-Smith felt London was her best choice for a career. Pixie left Pratt College in Brooklyn in 1899 and traveled to London with her father. Her father died that same year leaving her an orphan. Pixie’s first network of clients came through her association with Terry and the Lyceum Theater group. Her career soared.
Her first illustrated publication of African-Jamaican folk tales, Annancy Stories, was a success. She continued to build her client network through small theater performances of poetry and story reading in her home. Her list included famous playwrights, authors, poets and actors of the era. She excelled in Theatrical Set design and Costume design. Her clients were amazed at how easily she could make an illustration from the thought they were trying to project. If you think it is easy, try it. You will soon change your mind. She was able to monetize her synesthesia. That is seeing images while listening to music.
Everyone has that, to some degree, but hers was extremely advanced. Her fans loved the intellectual tickling that her art evoked. Although she was a child of the 2nd industrial revolution, her illustrations excluded anything from the mechanical age. She was always willing to share her knowledge and experience with other artists. She advised them to have the same energy that drives a piston. Her client list included the most successful playwrights, writers, poets and theatrical performers at the turn of the 20th Century. In her innocence, she felt her clients were her friends.
Pamela Coleman Smith could not get a small business loan. It was impossible in that era. No one would loan money for a woman owned business, especially a single woman owned business. She was paid by commissions. Smith started the publication and used everything she had as leverage to make it work. She had the best content and images from the most respected artists from her network of clients. She continued to do set design and invested the commissions into the magazine. Her graphics were now being attributed to Green Sheaf School, indicating Pixie had a good grasp of Market Branding techniques.
The young woman had worked in the Commercial Art industry as an illustrator since childhood, and had a thorough understanding of the latest technology. Without funding for modern equipment she was forced to use a century old technique for the binding process. It was quaint, but Smith’s business plan called for Avant Garde. The subscription rate didn’t meet expectations. The business was undercapitalized. It failed after 13 issues. Pamela Coleman Smith shut it down. Poor Fool, she found herself at rock bottom financially. Once she got fiscally stable again her career changed direction. She completed a large project that would become the defining project of her career. She was guaranteed complete artistic control. An immense project, it consisted of 80 illustrations for the Rider-Waite Tarot Deck, accurately illustrated, delivered in 6 months. The project was delivered on time, on budget, to the complete satisfaction of the author, Arthur Waite.
Sales of the deck were extremely successful. The only recognition Pixie got was a line in Waite’s accompanying book, “I commissioned a young woman to do the illustrations.” That was it. No residuals, no intellectual property. In a letter to her business associate, Alfred Stiglitz of the world famous Stiglitz Studio, she said of the project, “It was a large project for very little cash.” What contractor hasn’t made that same statement a time or two? No one knows how much Pixie left on the table, but Waite had a reputation as a tightwad and the contract was verbal. Pixie drifted away from her Golden Dawn friends after that. She continued making fantastic illustrations for the Shakespearean Theater and for publication but on a print-shop scale. She became heavily involved in Woman’s Sufferage. Female publishers were wary of the danger from an angry male population. She did a lot of work for community works projects, like international relief agencies and veterans programs.
Her uncle from Brooklyn died and left her enough inheritance to help her escape the rat race and move as far away from London as possible, and still remain in England. She moved to the town of Lizard, in Cornwall. That is the area that was known to have the largest concentration of pixies.
Her last visit to the US was when she visited a friend in Brooklyn in 1946. A devoted Catholic, she died in 1951. Her name and ideas faded into antiquity. In the Tarot deck The Fool doesn’t have a number, doesn’t belong to any suit, can go anywhere. The fool is a free spirit always appearing unexpectedly. It happened that way for Stuart Kaplan of US Games in 2009 when he published the Centennial edition of the Rider Waite Smith deck. He sells over 1.5 million decks each year, mostly as stocking stuffers at Christmas. That makes Pamela Colman Smith the most successful illustrator of 21st Century.